Charles Philips Resigns as President of Oracle

Posted by Paola Pullas | Posted in Noticias | Posted on 06-09-2010

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According to a communicate published in http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Charles-Phillips-Resigns-as-President-of-Oracle-NASDAQ-ORCL-1314228.htm Charles Philips resigns as President of Oracle Corporation.

Oracle (NASDAQ: ORCL) today announced that Charles Phillips has resigned his position as President and as a member of the board of directors.

“Charles has evolved our field culture toward a more customer-centric organization and improved our top line consistency through a period of tremendous change and growth,” said Oracle CEO Larry Ellison. “When Charles approached me last December and expressed his desire to transition out of the company, I asked him to stay on through the Sun integration which has gone well. We will miss his talent and leadership, but I respect his decision.”

“I want to thank Larry Ellison and the Oracle Board of Directors for the tremendous opportunity to be a part of an important and winning team for the last 29 quarters,” said Phillips. “It has been an honor to work with them, Safra Catz, and the thousands of Oracle employees around the world who are committed to delivering high quality products and services to customers, and to be a part of one of the most innovative companies on the planet.”

Day 5: Configuring ARCHIVELOG Mode

Posted by Paola Pullas | Posted in Administración, Base de Datos, Oracle | Posted on 05-09-2010

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Before to review this tutorial review this links:

Configuring the Flash Recovery Area

The flash recovery area is a storage location for all recovery related files. All files that are needed to completely recover a database from a media failure are part of the flash recovery area. Some files in the flash recovery area are: control files, redo logs, archived logs, backup pieces, image copies, flashback logs and foreign archived logs.

By allocating a storage location and unifying related recovery files within a specific area, the Oracle database server relieves the database administrator from having to manage the disk files created by these components.

When setting up a flash recovery area, you choose a directory, file system or Automatic Storage Management disk group to hold the files, and set a disk quota for the maximum space to be used for all files stored in the flash recovery area.

The flash recovery area should be on a separate disk from the working area. Keeping the flash recovery area on the same disk as the working area exposes you to loss of both your live database files and backups in the event of a disk failure.

You can execute the next command from SQL*Plus in order to verify the actual configuration of flash recovery area:

  • show parameter db_recovery_file_dest

If you want to change this configuration you can execute the alter system command from SQL*Plus to set the values that are more appropriate for your environment:

  • alter system set db_recovery_file_dest='/u01/app/oracle/flash_recovery_area' scope=both;
  • alter system set db_recovery_file_dest_size='2G' scope=both;

The first parameter shows you the physical directory of the flash recovery area and the second parameter shows you the quota or size assigned for this area. Keep in mind that quota should be bigger enough to keep the recovery files.

Another method to verify the flash recovery area configuration is using Enterprise Manager Dbconsole going to Availability –> Recovery Settings like I show you in the next screens.

Configuring the Archivelog Mode from SQL*Plus

The firs step is make a clean shutdown of your database using any of the next commands from SQL*Plus:

  • shutdown immediate;
  • shutdown normal;
  • shutdown transactional;

Then you should use the next commands from SQL*Plus in order to mount the database, configure the archivelog mode and finally open the database:

  • alter database mount;
  • alter database archivelog;
  • alter database open;

Next I will verify if my configuration is working properly with the next commands:

  • select log_mode from v$database;
  • alter system archive log current;

In the first screen the command verify the log mode of the database and in the second screen I am forcing the archiving process in the database:

Configuring the Archivelog Mode from Enterprise Manager Dbconsole

Login in Enterprise Manager Dbconsole page.

Go to Recovery Settings link under Availability tab.

Go to Media Recovery section and check the ARCHIVED Mode option then click in Apply button.

A Confirmation screen will appear after click in Apply button, then click in Yes button.

The next screen will appear and you should fill the text boxes with the os and database users information, in my case the os user is oracle and the database user with SYSDBA privilege is sys, then click in OK button.

The next screens will appear after this operation. You should wait a few minutes until the process finished. In order to know that this complete successfully you should refresh your browser until the login screen appears.

Author: Paola Pullas
Do you need to buy support?: Contact me at pp@refundation.com

If you think that this tutorial helped you. Make a donation to this initiative. We appreciate your support. Also your donation can help me to buy more coffee or Red Bull.





Remember: Database Administrator Responsabilities

Posted by Paola Pullas | Posted in Administración, Base de Datos, Oracle, Recuerda | Posted on 05-09-2010

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A database administrator’s responsibilities can include the following tasks:

  • Installing and upgrading the Oracle Database server and application tools.

  • Allocating system storage and planning future storage requirements for the database system.

  • Creating primary database storage structures (tablespaces) after application developers have designed an application.

  • Creating primary objects (tables, views, indexes) once application developers have designed an application.

  • Modifying the database structure, as necessary, from information given by application developers.

  • Enrolling users and maintaining system security.

  • Ensuring compliance with Oracle license agreements.

  • Controlling and monitoring user access to the database.

  • Monitoring and optimizing the performance of the database.

  • Planning for backup and recovery of database information.

  • Maintaining archived data on tape.

  • Backing up and restoring the database.

  • Contacting Oracle for technical support.

Ref.: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28310/dba001.htm#i1006120

Day 4: How to submit SQL commands to Oracle database

Posted by Paola Pullas | Posted in Administración, Base de Datos, Oracle | Posted on 05-09-2010

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There are different tools to access Oracle database in order to submit SQL commands. In this section I will show you 3 Oracle tools that you have with no extra cost. Before to review this tutorial review this links:

SQL*Plus

The firs tool is SQL*Plus, this is a command-line interface tool to access to Oracle database. You use SQL*Plus to execute many administrative tasks for example: start up and shut down the database, set database initialization parameters, create and manage users, create and alter database objects (such as tables and indexes), and more. In addition SQL*Plus can be used to insert and update data and run SQL queries.

The format to establish a connection using SQL*Plus is:

  • CONN[ECT] [logon] [AS {SYSOPER | SYSDBA}]
  • {username | /}[@connect_identifier]

In the next screen I will show you some examples in order to gain access to database from SQL*Plus.

  • sqlplus /nolog

  • connect sys/oracle as sysdba

  • conn sys/oracle@eva as sysdba

  • conn system/oracle

  • connect system/oracle@eva

  • connect system/oracle as sysdba

  • conn system/oracle as sysoper

  • conn hr/hr

  • conn hr/hr@eva

Enterprise Manager Dbconsole

Oracle Enterprise Manager Dbconsole is an intuitive graphical interface to administer the database.

In order to gain access to Enterprise Manager you should be a user defined like administrator in the application dbconsole. In the next screen I will show you the users that can login in the Oracle Enterprise Manager Dbconsole. In order to acess this screen you should login in Enterprise Manager Dbconsole like sys user and then go to Setup link in the right upper corner of the application:

In the next screens I will show you some examples in order to login in Enterprise Manager Dbconsole. The url to access have the format https://server_ip:em_port/em. If you don’t know the port to access the application you can find this in the file portlist.ini located in $ORACLE_HOME/install:

SQL Developer

Start the application with sqldeveloper command from a operating system terminal, and next create a connection in the graphical interface like I show you in the next screens:

Author: Paola Pullas
Do you need to buy support?: Contact me at pp@refundation.com

If you think that this tutorial helped you. Make a donation to this initiative. We appreciate your support. Also your donation can help me to buy more coffee or Red Bull.





Day 3: How to install SQL Developer in Linux

Posted by Paola Pullas | Posted in Aplicaciones, Base de Datos, Oracle | Posted on 04-09-2010

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In this post I will show you how to install Oracle SQL Developer in a Linux box. First, you should download the SQL Developer software from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/sql-developer/downloads/index.html.

Next, if you downloaded the software without JDK included, you need to download a JDK 1.6.11 version or above from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html

Install JDK

First install the JDK version in your Linux box in any directory. I will install the JDK in /u01/app/oracle like I show you in the next screens:

  • chmod a+x jdk-6u-linux-i586.bin
  • ./jdk-6u-linux-i586.bin

Install SQL Developer

Then install SQL Developer rpm using the next command:

  • rpm -Uhv sqldeveloper-2.1.1.64.45-1.noarch.rpm

Next, verify if the file jdk contains the JDK’s path. This file is located in $HOME/.sqldeveloper. If the JDK’s path that you installed previously isn’t registered in the jdk file, the first time that you launch the application, you should be prompted to provide the path.

Finally execute sqldeveloper with the next command:

  • sqldeveloper

Author: Paola Pullas
Do you need to buy support?: Contact me at pp@refundation.com

If you think that this tutorial helped you. Make a donation to this initiative. We appreciate your support. Also your donation can help me to buy more coffee or Red Bull.